Nadine has recently joined the Song Academy team.   Nadine is a singer-songwriter and graphic designer, currently working on her own artist project NADINE, alongside collaborations with other artists and producers.

We asked Nadine some questions to help aspiring young songwriters on their songwriting journey.

How old were you when you wrote your first song?  I think I was about 6 when I wrote my first song in rural Switzerland where I grew up. Poor Dad had to listen to me hammering around on the small organ that happened to be in his office.

What was your first song about?  I can remember it quite well, I sang “To Bethlehem goes Joseph” (in Swiss German) something about the journey in the Christmas story.

Who inspired you to start songwriting?  I used to watch my Mum perform with her band and always thought that was something I wanted to do as well. I loved experimenting with songwriting especially once my Mum had bought herself a big keyboard. I loved playing around on it and expressing my own moods and ideas.

What’s your favourite song you’ve ever written?  I think my favourite song of the ones I’ve written is ‘Bloom Out of Season’, a song still in the recording process. From the songs already released I’d say my favourite might be ‘Freedom You Won’, not because I think it’s the best song I’ve ever written but because I feel like I’ve been able to nail a very specific emotion I personally needed to express.

How easy did you find it to get your music heard?  Being heard can be challenging. My music tends to travel quite slowly. Sometimes I get some heartfelt feedback maybe a year after I’ve released songs! Spotify feels slightly random to me and I’m still learning about how to extend my reach through it.

What’s your biggest regret as a young songwriter?  I don’t have huge regrets as a songwriter but I wish I would have been more confident in my online presence. (Swiss culture doesn’t really appreciate self-promotion and I still have to tell myself it’s ok!)

What are your top tips for aspiring songwriters?  My top tip is to find a way to enjoy the process of songwriting and everything around it. If I only focus on trying to reach peak moments, I get too exhausted in the process and it’s less rewarding in the long run.

How do you write songs?   I believe you don’t have to wait for an especially creative mood when wanting to write a song. Sometimes playing around can spark ideas. I often just try different chord patterns on the keyboard and freely sing melodies and (sometimes silly) words that come to mind. I always record myself so I can stay in the flow and transcribe some fragments later on (if I’ve liked any). For me melodies and chords flow quite easily, but the lyrics take a lot of work and craft. I find it important to always being open to redraft and then also get constructive feedback from songwriters I trust.

What do you especially like about The Young Songwriter competition?  When I started songwriting I didn’t even know that being a Singer-Songwriter was a thing (and didn’t have an educational environment where songwriting was seen as something to be invested in) so I’d say that what excites me about the Young Songwriter Competition is simply that it exists!

Are you aged 8-18?  Have you written your own songs?  Then enter The Young Songwriter 2019 competition!

Eden has worked for various Song Academy songwriting clubs and workshops.  She has a strong background in musical theatre and studied songwriting at The Institute of Contemporary Music & Performance.

We asked Eden some questions to help aspiring young songwriters on their songwriting journey.

How old were you when you wrote your first song?  Probably about 10, and it was pretty bad. I started writing consistently and taking it more seriously from about the age of 16.

What was your first song about?  I think about sunsets! Like I said, I don’t think it was very good, but I just needed practice.

Who inspired you to start songwriting?  I would have to say Disney movies, my first musical love. Also the work of Cole Porter, ABBA, and many more.

What’s your favourite song you’ve ever written?  So far it’s ‘Red and Gold’, a Christmas song I wrote for the Iris Theatre. But even now I’m still improving.

How easy did you find it to get your music heard?  Not very easy, particularly as I write for other people and don’t perform myself. I was a couple years out of university before I got my first release. But if you network and take as many opportunities as you can, eventually one opportunity starts to lead to another.

What’s your biggest regret as a young songwriter?  Not taking myself and my skills more seriously.

What are your top tips for aspiring songwriters?  Listen to lots of different music, even things you don’t like – being versatile and being able to appreciate music that’s not your thing is really valuable.

How do you write songs?   Sometimes songs come easily, but sometimes they don’t, but you can’t just sit around waiting for inspiration! If a song isn’t working for me, I do research into genres and styles, I brainstorm, I make a lot of notes, then I leave it alone for a few days. And when I come back to it, it’s usually a lot easier.

What do you especially like about The Young Songwriter competition?  There aren’t a lot of opportunities to showcase young writers like this, so that’s great! I also look forward to hearing a wide range of voices and styles – diversity and individuality is so much more interesting than 20 songs that sound the same.

Are you aged 8-18?  Have you written your own songs?  Then enter The Young Songwriter 2019 competition!

Adam has recently joined the Song Academy team. He was awarded a prestigious scholarship to study BA Musical Theatre at The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and then studied MA Songwriting at The Institute of Contemporary Music & Performance.

We asked Adam some questions to help aspiring young songwriters on their songwriting journey.

How old were you when you wrote your first song?  I was probably about 13 when I first attempted to write a song but from memory it wasn’t exactly the best. The first song I properly wrote was a song called ‘Up’ when I was 19.

What was your first song about?  I had left school and started a performing arts course while a lot of my friends had moved on to university. I felt a little left behind by my peers and it was the first time I started to experience severe anxiety. ‘Up’ was my response to my anxious thoughts and feelings, telling myself to try and rise above those feelings and focus forward.

Who inspired you to start songwriting?  My biggest songwriting inspiration at that age was John Mayer.

What’s your favourite song you’ve ever written?  I wrote a song during my MA called ‘Let Me Down Slow’. It’s a song about a friend of mine who had recently been through a breakup.

How easy did you find it to get your music heard?  It’s a tricky industry for that but I think using the platforms that are readily available like Instagram, YouTube and Facebook to promote your music and teasing any releases for at least a month before the release itself is really important to get people excited for it!

What’s your biggest regret as a young songwriter?  Not writing the songs I wanted to hear.

What are your top tips for aspiring songwriters?  Listen to a lot of music and pay attention to the songs that speak to you and ask why. And more than anything, write YOUR music, not anyone else’s.

How do you write songs?  I rarely write lyrics first, that’s usually the second part for me. I will usually play through chord patterns on guitar to find an interesting sequence. Then I’ll sing jibberish over the top which sometimes informs the lyric as a few words can come out of the vocal melody writing. Then when I’m happy with the initial idea I’ll start to scribble down lyrical ideas and try to form a bit of a structure. Then over time and with re-drafting, I’ll try and make it succinct and make sure it’s telling the story as well as possible. Song maps are really helpful too!

What do you especially like about The Young Songwriter competition?  I love that the songs are judged by professional songwriters. The feedback you will get is so valuable – these guys really know what they’re talking about! I also love that there’s a platform for young songwriters to get their music heard; it’s the best exposure you’ll get when starting out!

Are you aged 8-18?  Have you written your own songs?  Then enter The Young Songwriter 2019 competition!

Davy Denke is a Soul Rock singer-songwriter and guitarist based in London. Born in Paris to Togolese parents, Davy has taught himself music as he travelled the world from the USA, to China, Poland and the UK.

We asked Davy some questions to help aspiring young songwriters on their songwriting journey.

How old were you when you wrote your first song?  I was actually quite old, 19 years old was the first I gave it a crack.

What was your first song about?  Sad emotions are usually the first and easiest ones to tap into while starting. My first song was about solitude in the US, as a young Frenchman trying to connect with people.

Who inspired you to start songwriting?  Jimi Hendrix, the Beatles and Jeff Buckley in equal measures. They all had an approach to songwriting that blew me away!

What’s your favourite song you’ve ever written?  A song called ‘Faith’, about the duality of being our own salvation and damnation.

How easy did you find it to get your music heard?  It’s not easy and requires both passion and consistency. Performing live is my favourite way of connecting to people. The immediate feedback is very helpful and motivating! The other way I like to share is on social media. Getting people connecting to my songwriting years after a song has dropped is particularly heartwarming.

What’s your biggest regret as a young songwriter?  I’m not that young anymore! Probably starting earlier! I’d put it in the following way, having the emotional tools to be able to convert my earlier experiences into well crafted songs would have been great. However, songwriting is a way of life and the best part is that the older we grow, the more tools and experiences we get!

What are your top tips for aspiring songwriters?   Stay in touch with yourself and work on your craft equally. A great way to do that is to get used to sharing your work on platforms like YouTube early enough to practice, receive feedback and connect with like-minded and musicians and artists!

What do you especially like about The Young Songwriter competition?  It’s a fantastic platform I wish I had when I was younger! It’s exciting to see young people already in love with the craft of songwriting and to think of the potential they hold to write about their experiences growing up from refreshing perspectives!

Are you aged 8-18?  Have you written your own songs?  Then enter The Young Songwriter 2019 competition!

Emily has co-written three top ten UK hits with Rizzlekicks and John Newman, as well as a US top three hit with Big Time Rush. Other recent projects include writing with Shura, Nicole Sherzinger, McFly, L Devine, Maddison Beer and SOAK.

We asked Emily some questions to help aspiring young songwriters on their songwriting journey.

How old were you when you wrote your first song?  I was 12 when I wrote my first song

What was your first song about?  It was a collaboration with my girlband at school. The song was called “Golden Boy”, it was about putting love in a halo!

Who inspired you to start songwriting?  A mixture of Pete Townsend (The Who) – he was a Dad of one of my band members when I was a kid.  Then after a 10 year gap of writing, I got back into writing in my 20’s. Daman Albarn (Blur, Gorillaz) was my flatmate and encouraged me to write.

What’s your favourite song you’ve ever written?  My favourite song is “Everybody Loves You” which I co-wrote with Soak (Rough Trade Records). We wrote it last year at the piano.

How easy did you find it to get your music heard?  I had a band in my 20’s and we did a lot of gigs and had an indie following, so playing live was one way to be heard.  It wasn’t until I was signed to SonyATV publishing a few years later as a writer when I had releases with much better known artists. Through them, the songs I was co-writing were heard.

What’s your biggest regret as a young songwriter?  I haven’t always stayed true to my instincts. In the beginning it was the only force driving the writing, but as success came with time, I found that some songs were written with an industry head on rather than heart. There is a difference between thinking something is good, and feeling that it’s good. Now with the benefit of hindsight I can see how important it is again to listen carefully to that inner voice and not be distracted by predicting or wishing for a certain outcome.

What are your top tips for aspiring songwriters?  Before a session, I find it helpful to write a stream of consciousness, – to encourage free flow of ideas and not edit anything. This process helps keep a fertile imagination. Confidence in sessions comes with the ability to express the feeling or thoughts you have in your mind, without caring about them being wrong or bad. All ideas are welcome before deciding on the best.  Be kind to your fellow writers and encourage each other!!

What do you especially like about The Young Songwriter competition?  It’s a fantastic way to encourage young aspiring songwriters to do their very best and aim for great art.

Are you aged 8-18?  Have you written your own songs?  Then enter The Young Songwriter 2019 competition!

It’s a great privilege that Miranda Cooper is on The Young Songwriter 2019 competition judging panel.  At one point Miranda’s songs spent more years on the UK chart than any other female songwriter in the UK and she has penned 4 number one hits – ‘Round Round’, ‘Hole in the Head’ for the Sugababes and ‘Sound of the Underground’ And ‘The Promise’ for Girls Aloud.

How old were you when you wrote your first song?  My Dad bought my sister and me a tiny Casio keyboard when I was about 8. We used to muck about on it and write little songs. We also used to write “symphonies” on the piano. The “Woodland symphony” which included the “Dance of the trout” was an early highlight!

What was your first song about?  The first song I remember from around that time had the memorable line “The sun was as big as a yellow balloon and all I ever knew was you”. I can still remember it now so maybe it was actually pretty hooky.

My first actual proper song was written on a backing track that Brian Higgins had given me. I’m not quite sure how I knew what to do but it just seemed to flow out of me!! It was called Cherry Red Scooter! It was pretty out there lyrically but it was enough for Brian to want to start collaborating.

Who inspired you to start songwriting?  To be honest I had no idea it was even a possible career choice when I was growing up. I trained as a dancer and did some TV presenting and ended up in female pop duo. But I really just felt like I was treading water until I was introduced to Brian Higgins, who had seen me dancing on the Eurovision Song Contest. He gave me a couple of backing tracks to write on and something just clicked. I felt like I’d finally found my “thing”.

What’s your favourite song you’ve ever written?  I have a soft spot for Call the Shots. I wrote the chorus in a hotel room in Paris, 2 years before the girls recorded it. We just didn’t feel they were ready for it at the time. We then wrote the verses in a hotel in LA and I finished the lyric by the pool at the Sunset Marquee hotel. So that song has some rather exotic memories.  I also loved The Promise. We had the piece of music for a while and just knew it was killer. We wrote it on a gorgeous summer’s day and it practically wrote itself!

How easy did you find it to get your music heard?  I was very lucky to start my song writing career with Brian who had a huge worldwide hit with Cher’s Believe a year after we met. As a result he had access to pretty much every label and manager and our music always got a good listen.

What’s your biggest regret as a young songwriter?  I actually don’t have any regrets. I think even the things I perceived as mistakes at the time were actually hugely helpful in hindsight. We were all making it up as we went along and there were some amazing highs and some desperate lows. Having Brian there to protect us from a lot of the industry helped alot. It meant we could just focus on the writing.  I had a pretty big fear of failure which wasn’t always easy to live with but I think it helped push me the extra mile on many occasions.

What are your top tips for aspiring songwriters?  Firstly I would say just do what you love and don’t worry about what anybody else thinks…..to a point.  When I started at Xeno there were just 4 of us and we holed up in Brian’s garden shed (thankfully converted into a studio!) and just wrote from the heart. There was no internet and we were in the middle of darkest Kent so nothing to distract. We were basically in our little bubble and breaking the rules left right and centre. It was a pretty idyllic time.

When I started out I would write the songs in my head walking to the gym and then come in and work out the chords with Brian.  Eventually some amazing multi instrumentalists joined Xeno and made incredible instrumental backing tracks. We’d write melodies on 5 or 10 of them at a time. Just like a melodic stream of consciousness, trying to better each idea we came up with.

I’d constantly write down concepts and lyric ideas and try them out on the different tracks. When a great lyric, melody and track clicked we were onto something.  We had the luxury of time and would start some ideas and then revisit them days, weeks, months or even years later.  We’d only finish the ideas that got us really excited.  And we actively tried not to repeat ourselves.

Don’t try and work with too many people. Find the collaborators you really connect with and spend more time with them. Good stuff always happens when you’re having fun! It finds its way into the music.

What do you especially like about The Young Songwriter competition?
I really want to support anything that gives a platform to young songwriters nowadays. There’s more music out there than ever but it’s also harder to get heard. I’m very excited to hear the songs that make it through to the final.

Are you aged 8-18?  Have you written your own songs?  Then enter The Young Songwriter 2019 competition!

 

We’re delighted to have Rumer on The Young Songwriter 2019 competition judging panel.  Rumer is a British singer-songwriter supported by many leading music industry figures including Burt Bacharach, Jools Holland and Elton John.

We asked Rumer some questions to help aspiring young songwriters on their songwriting journey.

How old were you when you wrote your first song?  When I was about five years old I would write out the words to songs that I liked so I could learn them, and if I didn’t understand the words or I couldn’t make them out on the tape I would make up my own. I didn’t really write a song till I was about 14.

What was your first song about?  Something emotionally abstract…a stream of consciousness.

Who inspired you to start songwriting?  My brother used to write his own songs and I was such a big fan of them. I used to sit next to him with an old BBC tape recorder and record him performing. When my brothers practiced their band they would lift me up and let me sing into the microphone.

What’s your favourite song you’ve ever written?  Probably Thankful, because it took a long time, and over many seasons and there was a lot of magic that showed up for that song.

How easy did you find it to get your music heard?  Not easy at all! Things have changed a lot since I was trying to get my music out there.. now you can use the internet to get your music heard.  For me back then the only option was to somehow get a record deal and a publishing deal. Back then that was the only way, and it seemed like an impossible challenge when you have no contacts in the music industry whastsoever.

What’s your biggest regret as a young songwriter?  I should not have given up piano lessons! And I should have made more effort to get better on the guitar, and to have more confidence!

What are your top tips for aspiring songwriters?  Writing songs is hard! My advice is to always keep doing it, even if you’re not coming up with much that you like, or that you think is very good. The reason is you have to keep throwing sticks on the fire of creativity, or inspiration may go out completely, and writers block is really hard to break through when you’re stuck energetically and out of practice. It affects your confidence. Writing songs is a lot about accepting the bad songs as part of the process. Every successful writer I have ever worked with – they have a ton of bad songs they have written, but the difference is, they don’t care, they don’t judge them, they just don’t stop, and every now and then they strike gold, simply because they are showing up and doing it every day.

What do you especially like about The Young Songwriter competition?  I really enjoy listening to all the songs, and I am always amazed by the talent, especially of some of the younger entrants.

Are you aged 8-18?  Have you written your own songs?  Then enter The Young Songwriter 2019 competition!

 

Eg White has been a Young Songwriter competition judge since it started 8 years ago.

We asked Eg some questions to help aspiring young songwriters on their songwriting journey.

How old were you when you wrote your first song?  It rather depends on your definition of a song. I think the right answer is about 17, when I was in a group called Brother Beyond, and where my contributions to the music started to go beyond playing bass and keyboards, into lyrics and melody for the first time.  The songs up to that point had all been written by the keyboard player, Carl Fysh, but I started contributing melodies and perhaps words to his songs then. I don’t think it was long at that point before I started some from scratch on my own.

What was your first song about?  The sad truth is I can’t remember what my first song was. Certainly, when I think of the songs written about that time, my whole body goes into spasm at how awful the words were. It was a good year or so until I even listened to the words in Prince’s songs, or heard Joni Mitchell and started to properly realise their potential power.

Who inspired you to start songwriting?  It was clear in Brother Beyond that Carl was, if not having all the fun, then at least getting all the responsibility. In terms of aspirational writing, at that point it was Steely Dan, Prince, Joni Mitchell and quite possibly Luther Vandross, though maybe with Luther I was still in a muddle about where bass playing finished and the song began.

What’s your favourite song you’ve ever written?  I heard “give me something“ by James Morrison in the supermarket the other day, and I thought it sounded good. I really like the way the chords in the verse lead you to think that a particular type of chorus is coming, and then what comes in is properly different, especially with Jim singing for his life, and it did sound good in Tesco’s.  Normally a song comes good really quickly, but that one ducked and dived on us for hours and only turned a corner late in the afternoon.

How easy did you find it to get your music heard?  That feels like a contemporary question, with a particular nod to the Internet. I know it’s not, but back in the day, there was a prescribed route for getting your music heard.  It went like this: make music with people, probably in your hometown, play a few really bad gigs, and try and get a deal with a label.
Then, having got that deal, try and write THE song which you’re hoping will get played on the radio, preferably Radio One, that then doesn’t get played on the radio. That at least was my story.

I was in two bands, a country funk band when I was 14, then a pop group, and then after that in a duo with a girl called Alice. They all made enough money to get by, The record with Alice was very well liked indeed but none of them really got heard in any wider way.

I then would write whole albums with singers, four of five of them in a row in the late 1990s, none of which took off, in spite of expectations, and then I had my first taste of stuff actually getting heard at the very end of 2003, after having been writing songs for something like 18 years.

What’s your biggest regret as a young songwriter?  My biggest regret as a songwriter, young or indeed quite old, is that I can’t do that thing where you really refine the song down, without making it trite or simplistic. I’m sure that would have helped many more of the songs get through, but actually now I look at it, maybe I don’t regret that. Life is messy, why shouldn’t songs be?

What are your top tips for aspiring songwriters?  There’s really only one, which is not to think that you’re going to try and write the greatest song of all time, but just try to get a flow going, write a song every day or two, write with different people who have different or similar skill sets to you, but don’t save anything up. Put your best foot forward every time.

Oh dear, I’m on a roll now, there won’t just be one top tip. Much more important is that you listen to everybody else’s music! As much as you can, especially from outside of the mainstream. It’s a very broad church. The only thing to run against that advice is the fact that everybody seems much more litigious than they used to be. The rules used to be very clear about what you could take and what you couldn’t, but nowadays it seems people are suing everybody.

Anyway, these days, I prefer to run blind, as opposed to a more targeted way of writing before where I would try and start with the thing that was most likely to fail, which usually meant the lyric on the central hook. I would then build everything around that, but the trouble is when you know where you’re going, the ride is never so exciting. Now I just pick up an instrument, and pretty much order everybody to start making noises.

What do you especially like about The Young Songwriter competition?  For me, personally, it’s always been very interesting to see what really young writers are doing. I’ve always prized individualism above technical skill, though obviously the two should ideally both be in place, but there have been occasional entrants who have managed to bring everything together, by which I mean blinding use of truly unexpected melody against chords I would never have used and have got away with it, giving me a proper thrill.

In my fantasy, the young writers in this contest are finding fresh new paths through uncharted territory, and on more than one occasion I have heard this.

Don’t chase the money, kids. It’s never where you expect it to be.

Are you aged 8-18?  Have you written your own songs?  Then enter The Young Songwriter 2019 competition!

Star Judges include Tom Odell, Imelda May, Chris Difford, Rumer,

Eg White, Emily Phillips, Dan Gillespie Sells, Miranda Cooper & Nigel Elderton.

Now in it’s 8th exciting year, the prestigious Song Academy Young Songwriter Competition 2019 is open for entries until 31st March 2019 from young people aged 8-18 across the UK & Ireland and internationally.

The Young Songwriter 2019 competition is a supportive and inspiring platform for young songwriters to get their original songs heard and connect to their peers & key players in the music industry. This unique competition focuses on songwriting rather than singing/performance. Songs will be judged on their originality, lyrics, melody, composition, and potential to be a smash hit!

We believe that it is more important than ever, in this fast-paced, competitive and technological world, for young people to believe in themselves and be inspired by their future. Songwriting is an antidote to the pressures on young minds and allows young people to express themselves creatively and gain clarity on what’s going on in their heads and the world outside. Each year, The Young Songwriter competition brings together young songwriters who listen to each other’s stories, feel a sense of togetherness and unite in a vibrant songwriting community.  Please help us reach young songwriters aged 8-18 across the world.

There are many reasons to enter The Young Songwriter 2019 competition:

  • Get noticed by some of the best songwriters & key players in the Music Industry
  • Have your songs heard and stand out from the crowd
  • Get connected to our vibrant community of young songwriters
  • Record your winning song with a top producer in London
  • Win prizes: a professional music video & photos from the recording session, a home studio setup from Focusrite , KRK & sE Electronics, a Casio Music CT-x5000 portable keyboard, a signed Tom Odell ‘Jubilee Road’ Album, a signed copy of songwriter Carole King‘s book ‘A Natural Woman’
  • Perform in The Young Songwriter 2019 showcase at The Tabernacle, London

This competition will be separately judged for UK & Ireland 8-12 year olds, UK & Ireland 13-18 year olds and international entries. Enter online at www.songacademy.co.uk/says19 Include songs’ lyrics on your entry forms and an audio recording in MP3 format (or send your audio recording via SoundCloud).

Schools entering 20+ songs will have the opportunity of winning a Casio CT-x700 portable keyboard.

This year’s panel of award winning judges includes:

Singer songwriters/producers Tom Odell, Imelda May, Chris Difford, Rumer, Dan Gillespie Sells, Eg White (Adele, Duffy, Take That, Pink), Emily Philips (Rizzlekicks, John Newman, Maddison Beer, SOAK), Miranda Cooper (Girls Aloud, Sugababes, Pet Shop Boys, Alesha Dixon), James Walsh, Tim Laws (Gabrielle, Lighthouse Family), Jessica Sharman (Ward Thomas), Nicky Cox (editor, First News) and Nigel Elderton (Chairman, PRS for Music).

Get your songs ready!

Take advantage of our song feedback service where we provide insightful comments on the three areas of lyrics, melodies/composition and production.

Quotes from The Young Songwriter competition judges:

Tom Odell, Singer Songwriter, says “When I was 13 years old I started writing songs, and over the following years I became more and more obsessed with it. But the thing that always kept me awake at night was how to get them out there for people to hear them. This is why I think the Song Academy Young Songwriter competition is a great way to inspire and help through this process, and its something I wish had been around when I was starting out. I can’t wait to hear the songs!”

Imelda May, Singer Songwriter, says “I’m very glad to be part of The Song Academy Young Songwriter 2018 judging panel. Good songwriting is the foundation of all good music. This competition is also simply a great way for songwriters to meet other like minded people and I’m happy to encourage anyone to connect and excel in this beautifully expressive art form and cannot wait to hear the songs.”

Naughty Boy, producer & songwriter, says “Young songwriters are the future of music. A great song will always stand the test of time far beyond our years. I think this competition is important because every songwriter I’ve worked with was always waiting to be discovered.”

Guy Chambers, producer & songwriter, says “It was a great pleasure to judge The Young Songwriter 2018 competition this year.  I was incredibly impressed by the level of songwriting and musicianship among these young individuals”.

Myles Keller, PRS for Music, says “PRS for Music is delighted to be supporting the Song Academy Young Songwriter competition once again.  This wonderful competition empowers young songwriters, enabling them to showcase their talent and offering them a ‘one of a kind’ opportunity to gain crucial feedback from some of the very best songwriters.  In the early stages of a career, this kind of help is like gold dust and really enables industry newcomers to build strong, sustainable careers.”

Simon Barber & Brian O’Connor, founders of Sodajerker says “Judging the 2018 Young Songwriter competition was a fascinating experience, not only because of the wonderful breadth of talented writers who submitted work, but also because of the incredible range of responses that the songs elicited from the judges. It was heartening to see each judge devote such a great deal of time and attention to thinking about the qualities of each song, and whatever the outcome, all finalists should be proud to have reached that stage of the competition. We are delighted to play a small role in such a fantastic scheme led by such a generous organisation. The opportunity that it offers young songwriters to be heard by leading figures in the music industries is second to none.”

Rowena Atkins, Founder of Song Academy, says: “Song Academy inspires young people to express themselves, celebrate their individuality & get heard.   By connecting them to a vibrant community of their peers who all love writing songs, as well as exposing their songs to key players in the Music Industry, we help to build young people’s confidence, self-belief and drive to achieve their potential.”

Azi Eftekhari, Head of Music Partnerships in the UK, YouTube, says: “It’s so important to nurture young songwriters, helping them harness their creative energy, express themselves, and be part of a community. YouTube Music is proud to support the Song Academy Young Songwriter competition and we can’t wait to see how these talented songwriters grow through this truly impactful programme.”

Quotes from past The Young Songwriter finalists:

Laura, Young Songwriter Finalist, says “Being a self confessed bedroom musician the Young Songwriter competition has given me the opportunity to take my songs into the real world.”

Roman, Young Songwriter Finalist, says “It encourages young people to believe in themselves.”

Sam, Young Songwriter Finalist, says “I like how it is focused on songwriting and not particularly vocal or instrumental talent, especially in this day and age, where that’s a critical factor for success. But if you can write a hit, it’s arguably more impressive than if you can sing one, and I think this competition shows that.”

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Who are we? A Song Academy overview

Founded 10 years ago, Song Academy inspires and nurtures the next generation of songwriters & creative leaders.   We are a unique platform for young people (aged 8-18) to express themselves, be heard and be part of an exciting community.

Our uniqueness is that we focus on the creative process of songwriting – writing powerful lyrics and composing interesting melodies & instrumental parts. We develop songwriters’ skills to write a song that touches, moves and inspires people – either hit songs with mass appeal or for a niche audience. In young people’s demanding, fast-paced and technological lives, Song Academy offers a refreshing space where they can express their thoughts, fears, excitements, disappointments, and opinions in a safe, encouraging environment.  A space where they feel listened to and can contribute to others, enabling them to build a strong mental health and create their own future.

Song Academy runs after-school clubs, holiday workshops, school workshops, birthday parties and an annual international Young Songwriter competition. As a result of our programmes, we have seen a direct correlation in the increase and advancement of confidence, self-esteem, creativity, motivation, well-being and technical songwriting ability of our members.

 

 

* Album release showcasing the top young songwriters around the world

* Judges included Tom Odell, Guy Chambers, Eg White, Imelda May & Lucie Silvas

#SAYS18 #ExpressYourself   #BeHeard #Community #Songwriting

Song Academy is delighted to announce the release of the Song Academy Young Songwriter 2018 Compilation Album on Spotify, iTunes and other distributors through AWAL (Artists Without A Label). The album includes 24 tracks from the winners and selected finalists & highly commended of the 2018 Young Songwriter competition, which attracted outstanding young talent from 8-18 year olds around the world.

This album not only gives young songwriters a unique platform to get noticed by a larger audience and educate them in the digital world of e-commerce and the dynamics of the music industry, but it also provides them with their own revenue source. Links to the album on iTunes & Spotify are:

The Young Songwriter 2018 Album on iTunes

The Young Songwriter 2018 Album on Spotify

This year’s panel of award winning judges included:

Singer songwriters Tom Odell, Imelda May & Lucie Silvas, songwriters & producers Guy Chambers (for Robbie Williams, Tom Jones, Kylie Minogue, & Mark Ronson), Eg White (Adele, Duffy, Take That, Pink), Tim Laws (Gabrielle, Lighthouse Family), Jessica Sharman (for Ward Thomas), Nicky Cox (editor, First News), Nigel Elderton (Chairman, PRS for Music) and Toby Davies (National Adviser Rock & Pop, Trinity College London).

The prestigious Song Academy Young Songwriter competition has gone from strength to strength since it’s launch in 2012 and is now the leading songwriting competition for young people aged 8 to 18 across the world with a strong sense of community. It’s a springboard for the next generation of creative stars to get noticed by key players in the music industry, build confidence, have their voices heard and shine in the limelight. The 2018 competition attracted circa 500 high quality entries from cities across the world, from London, Dublin, Cairo, Helinski, Johannesburg, Nashville, New York, Reykjavik, Zagreb to Melbourne.

Tom Odell, singer songwriter said “When I was 13 years old I started writing songs, and over the following years I became more and more obsessed with it.  But the thing that always kept me awake at night was how to get them out there for people to hear them. This is why I think The Song Academy Young Songwriter competition is a great way to inspire and help through this process, and its something I wish had been around when I was starting out.”

Guy Chambers, songwriter & producer said “It’s a huge pleasure to be a part of this years judging panel for the Song Academy Young Songwriter 2018. I have always been a supporter and nurturer of young talent, so it will be great to see what this year’s competition has to offer.”

Imelda May, singer songwriter said “I’m very glad to be part of The Song Academy Young Songwriter 2018 judging panel. Good songwriting is the foundation of all good music. This competition is also simply a great way for songwriters to meet other like minded people and I’m happy to encourage anyone to connect and excel in this beautifully expressive art form and cannot wait to hear the songs.”

Simon Barber & Brian O’Connor, founders of Sodajerker said “Judging the 2018 Young Songwriter competition was a fascinating experience, not only because of the wonderful breadth of talented writers who submitted work, but also because of the incredible range of responses that the songs elicited from the judges. It was heartening to see each judge devote such a great deal of time and attention to thinking about the qualities of each song, and whatever the outcome, all finalists should be proud to have reached that stage of the competition. We are delighted to play a small role in such a fantastic scheme led by such a generous organisation. The opportunity that it offers young songwriters to be heard by leading figures in the music industries is second to none.”

Rowena Atkins, Founder of Song Academy, says: “Here at Song Academy, we are aiming to give young people a voice, help them to express themselves powerfully and celebrate their individuality. By connecting them to a vibrant community of their peers who all love writing original songs, as well as exposing their songs to key players in the Music Industry, we build young people’s confidence, self-belief and help them achieve their potential.”

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Who are we? A Song Academy overview

Founded 9 years ago, Song Academy champions young people aged 8-18 and is nurturing the next generation of songwriters & creative leaders.

Our uniqueness is that we focus on the creative process of songwriting – writing powerful lyrics and composing interesting melodies & instrumental parts. We develop songwriters’ skills to write a song that touches, moves and inspires people – either hit songs with mass appeal or for a niche audience. In a world of the X-factor, Britain’s got talent and the quest for instant fame, Song Academy offers a refreshing spotlight on the heart of songs – the words & melodies and enables young songwriters to build strong and sustainable careers.

Song Academy runs after-school clubs, holiday workshops, school workshops, birthday parties and an annual international Young Songwriter competition. As a result of our programmes, we have seen a direct correlation in the increase and advancement of confidence, self-esteem, creativity, motivation, well-being and technical song-writing ability in our members.

Facebook & Twitter: SongacademyUK

Instagram: song_academy

Email: contact@songacademy.co.uk

Tel: 07710 023743

CREATIVITY • COURAGE • INDIVIDUALITY • SELF EXPRESSION • INSPIRATION